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Take charge of your health today. Be informed. Be involved. …Hypertension

Home/Take charge of your health today. Be informed. Be involved. …Hypertension

Take charge of your health today. Be informed. Be involved. …Hypertension

By: Esther Bush, for New Pittsburgh Courier

This month, the “Take Charge of Your Health Today” page focuses on hypertension. Erricka Hager, health advocate at the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, and Esther L. Bush, president and CEO of the Urban League of Greater Pittsburgh, spoke about this topic.

EB: Good morning, Erricka. Although hypertension, or high blood pressure, is a health topic that we’ve covered before, I’m eager to learn if researchers have made progress in understanding more about this chronic disease. I’m glad we’re taking the time today to discuss hypertension research.

EH: Yes. This month’s page is filled with beneficial information about how our behaviors and lifestyle choices affect our blood pressure. We even feature a research study that is examining the relationship between physical activity at work and elevated blood pressures. Not only can this study benefit the communities we serve but also improve the health of our Urban League staff as well. I’m also excited to discuss hypertension because, not only does it affect my loved ones, but it greatly affects the communities we serve. The American Heart Association has updated the recommendations for healthy blood pressure, which is now 120/80 mmHg or less. This means that more African Americans are now considered to have high blood pressure. We know that hypertension greatly affects African American communities. However, researchers are still unsure why it affects our communities more than others. Dr. Amber Johnson talks about this, including how researchers are even trying to understanding why certain treatments may be different.

EH: Yes. This month’s page is filled with beneficial information about how our behaviors and lifestyle choices affect our blood pressure. We even feature a research study that is examining the relationship between physical activity at work and elevated blood pressures. Not only can this study benefit the communities we serve but also improve the health of our Urban League staff as well. I’m also excited to discuss hypertension because, not only does it affect my loved ones, but it greatly affects the communities we serve. The American Heart Association has updated the recommendations for healthy blood pressure, which is now 120/80 mmHg or less. This means that more African Americans are now considered to have high blood pressure. We know that hypertension greatly affects African American communities. However, researchers are still unsure why it affects our communities more than others. Dr. Amber Johnson talks about this, including how researchers are even trying to understanding why certain treatments may be different.

 

EB: That’s correct, Erricka. The communities we serve might not always know exactly where to get information or even feel comfortable talking to their doctors about their hypertension. It’s difficult for both staff and community members to keep up with not only the medical advances related to hypertension but other chronic diseases affecting African Americans. That’s why is important for us to continue to have these conversations about research and health to continue to educate and empower the African American community. In his overview, Dr. Evan Ray provides some really easy-to-understand information about blood pressure and how to prevent and control it. Getting more active and eating healthy are effective ways that African Americans can have a positive impact on lowering blood pressure.

EH: I agree. This conversation couldn’t have happened at a better time because we, at the Urban League, are currently challenging our staff to get more active during the workday. We even invited a local chef to come and talk with the staff about the benefits of eating healthy. Also, the RESET-BP research study you mentioned is a perfect opportunity for our staff members to take charge of their health. Staff and Courier readers are encouraged to utilize the resources our free Health Education Office to not only have their blood pressure checked but get information about changing their diet and ways to get active. We now even have a blood pressure machine in our building. Knowing and monitoring your blood pressure numbers are important.

EB: I second that! Thanks for having this chat with me, Erricka. We’ve provided some great information and ways that readers can take charge of their healthy today. I look forward to chatting with you next month as we discuss the All of Us Pennsylvania Research Program and precision medicine.

2018-05-14T12:53:34+00:00 May 14th, 2018|Making News|